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Cicero Quotes


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Rightly defined philosophy is simply the love of wisdom.
 

Silence is one of the great arts of conversation.
 

So near is falsehood to truth that a wise man would do well not to trust himself on the narrow edge.
 

Socrates, indeed, when he was asked of what country he called himself, said, "Of the world"; for he considered himself an inhabitant and a citizen of the whole world.
[World]
 

Strain every nerve to gain your point.
 

Such praise coming from so degraded a source, was degrading to me, its recipient.
 

Superstition is a senseless fear of God; religion the intelligent and pious worship of the deity.
[Superstition]
 

Sweet is the memory of past troubles.
 

Take from a man his reputation for probity, and the more shrewd and clever he is, the more hated and mistrusted he becomes.
 

Taxes are the sinews of the state.
 

That last day does not bring extinction to us, but change of place.
[Change]
 

That which is called dotage, is not the weak point of all old men, but only of such as are distinguished by their levity and weakness.
[Age]
 

The absolute good is not a matter of opinion but of nature.
 

The administration of government, like a guardianship, ought to be directed to the good of those who confer, not of those who receive the trust.
[Government]
 

The arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and assistance to foreign hands should be curtailed, lest Rome fall.
 

The authority of those who teach is often an obstacle to those who want to learn.
 

The avarice of the old: it's absurd to increase one's luggage as one nears the journey's end.
 

The beauty of the world and the orderly arrangement of everything celestial makes us confess that there is an excellent and eternal nature, which ought to be worshiped and admired by all mankind.
[Nature]
 

The best interpreter of the law is custom.
 

The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled, public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed lest Rome become bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance.
 


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