> Author Index > P - Authors > Edgar Allan Poe Quotes

Edgar Allan Poe Quotes


An American poet, short story writer, editor, critic and a leading American Romanticist.
(1809 - 1849)

Pages: 123Next

A strong argument for the religion of Christ is this - that offences against Charity are about the only ones which men on their death-beds can be made - not to understand - but to feel - as crime.
[Against]
 

All religion, my friend, is simply evolved out of fraud, fear, greed, imagination, and poetry.
 

All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream.
 

And the Raven, never flitting, Still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas Just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming Of a demon's that is dreaming, And the lamplight o'er him streaming Throws his shadow on the floor, And my soul from out that shadow, That lies floating on the floor, Shall be lifted - nevermore.
[Birds]
 

Beauty of whatever kind, in its supreme development, invariably excites the sensitive soul to tears.
[Beauty]
 

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before.
 

Experience has shown, and a true philosophy will always show, that a vast, perhaps the larger portion of the truth arises from the seemingly irrelevant.
 

I am above the weakness of seeking to establish a sequence of cause and effect, between the disaster and the atrocity.
 

I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity.
 

I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it.
 

I have no faith in human perfectability. I think that human exertion will have no appreciable effect upon humanity. Man is now only more active - not more happy - nor more wise, than he was 6000 years ago.
[Active]
 

I have, indeed, no abhorrence of danger, except in its absolute effect - in terror.
 

I wish I could write as mysterious as a cat.
 

I would define, in brief, the poetry of words as the rhythmical creation of Beauty.
 

If you wish to forget anything on the spot, make a note that this thing is to be remembered.
 

In criticism I will be bold, and as sternly, absolutely just with friend and foe. From this purpose nothing shall turn me.
 

In efforts to soar above our nature, we invariably fall below it.
 

In one case out of a hundred a point is excessively discussed because it is obscure; in the ninety-nine remaining it is obscure because it is excessively discussed.
 

It is by no means an irrational fancy that, in a future existence, we shall look upon what we think our present existence, as a dream.
 

It is the nature of truth in general, as of some ores in particular, to be richest when most superficial.
 


Pages: 123Next