> Author Index > C - Authors > G. K. Chesterton Quotes

G. K. Chesterton Quotes


Pages: Prev 12345678910... Next

The only defensible war is a war of defense.
 

The only people who seem to have nothing to do with the education of the children are the parents.
 

The only way of catching a train I have ever discovered is to miss the train before.
 

The only way to be sure of catching a train is to miss the one before it.
 

The ordinary scientific man is strictly a sentimentalist. He is a sentimentalist in this essential sense, that he is soaked and swept away by mere associations.
 

The paradox of courage is that a man must be a little careless of his life even in order to keep it.
[Courage]
 

The perplexity of life arises from there being too many interesting things in it for us to be interested properly in any of them.
[Concentration]
 

The poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.
[Poetry]
 

The poor complain that they are governed badly. The rich complain that they are governed at all.
 

The poor have sometimes objected to being governed badly; the rich have always objected to being governed at all.
 

The present condition of fame is merely fashion.
 

The Puritans are always denouncing books that inflame lust; what shall we say of books that inflame the viler passions of avarice and pride?
See quote detail

The purpose of Compulsory Education is to deprive the common people of their commonsense.
 

The rich are the scum of the earth in every country.
 

The simplification of anything is always sensational.
 

The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion.
[Argument]
 

The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see.
 

The trouble with always trying to preserve the health of the body is that it is so difficult to do without destroying the health of the mind.
 

The true object of all human life is play. Earth is a task garden; heaven is a playground.
[Goals]
 

The vulgar man is always the most distinguished, for the very desire to be distinguished is vulgar.
 


Pages: Prev 12345678910... Next