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George Eliot Quotes


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People who can't be witty exert themselves to be devout and affectionate.
 

Perhaps the most delightful friendships are those in which there is much agreement, much disputation, and yet more personal liking.
[Friendship]
 

Perhaps the wind wails so in winter for the summer's dead; and all sad sounds are nature's funeral cries for what has been and is not.
[Wind]
 

Play not with paradoxes. That caustic which you handle in order to scorch others may happen to sear your own fingers and make them dead to the quality of things.
[Positive]
 

Quarrel? Nonsense; we have not quarreled. If one is not to get into a rage sometimes, what is the good of being friends?
 

Rome - the city of visible history, where the past of a whole hemisphere seems moving in funeral procession with strange ancestral images and trophies gathered from afar.
 

Science is properly more scrupulous than dogma. Dogma gives a charter to mistake, but the very breath of science is a contest with mistake, and must keep the conscience alive.
 

Speech is often barren; but silence also does not necessarily brood over a full nest. Your still fowl, blinking at you without remark, may all the while be sitting on one addled nest-egg; and when it takes to cackling, will have nothing to announce but that addled delusion.
[Silence]
 

Speech may be barren; but it is ridiculous to suppose that silence is always brooding on a nestful of eggs.
[Silence]
 

That farewell kiss which resembles greeting, that last glance of love which becomes the sharpest pang of sorrow.
[Kisses]
 

That's what a man wants in a wife, mostly; he wants to make sure one fool tells him he's wise.
 

The beginning of an acquaintance whether with persons or things is to get a definite outline of our ignorance.
 

The beginning of compunction is the beginning of a new life.
[Decisions]
 

The best augury of a man's success in his profession is that he thinks it the finest in the world.
 

The contented man is never poor; the discontented never rich.
[Contentment]
 

The desire to conquer is itself a sort of subjection.
[Self Control]
 

The devil tempts us not. It is we tempt him, beckoning his skill with opportunity.
[Temptation]
 

The earliest and oldest and longest has still the mastery of us.
[Antiquity]
 

The egoism which enters into our theories does not affect their sincerity; rather, the more our egoism is satisfied, the more robust is our belief.
 

The finest language is mostly made up of simple unimposing words.
 


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