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George Santayana Quotes


Philosopher, essayist, poet and novelist.
(1863 - 1952)

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A child only educated at school is an uneducated child.
[Education]
 

A conception not reducible to the small change of daily experience is like a currency not exchangeable for articles of consumption; it is not a symbol, but a fraud.
[Change]
 

A man is morally free when, in full possession of his living humanity, he judges the world, and judges other men, with uncompromising sincerity.
 

A man's feet should be planted in his country, but his eyes should survey the world.
 

A man's memory may almost become the art of continually varying and misrepresenting his past, according to his interest in the present.
[The Past]
 

A soul is but the last bubble of a long fermentation in the world.
 

A string of excited, fugitive, miscellaneous pleasures is not happiness; happiness resides in imaginative reflection and judgment, when the picture of one's life, or of human life, as it truly has been or is, satisfies the will, and is gladly accepted.
 

Advertising is the modern substitute for argument; its function is to make the worse appear the better.
[Advertising]
 

All living souls welcome whatever they are ready to cope with; all else they ignore, or pronounce to be monstrous and wrong, or deny to be possible.
 

All thought is naught but a footnote to Plato.
 

Almost every wise saying has an opposite one, no less wise, to balance it.
[Wisdom]
 

America is a young country with an old mentality.
[America]
 

America is the greatest of opportunities and the worst of influences.
 

An artist is a dreamer consenting to dream of the actual world.
[Art]
 

An artist may visit a museum but only a pedant can live there.
 

Art is a delayed echo.
 

Beauty as we feel it is something indescribable; what it is or what it means can never be said.
[Beauty]
 

Before he sets out, the traveler must possess fixed interests and facilities to be served by travel.
 

Before you contradict an old man, my fair friend, you should endeavor to understand him.
 

Bid, then, the tender light of faith to shine By which alone the mortal heart is led Unto the thinking of the thought divine.
 


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