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Giacomo Casanova Quotes


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In fact, to gull a fool seems to me an exploit worthy of a witty man.
 

In the mean time I worship God, laying every wrong action under an interdict which I endeavour to respect, and I loathe the wicked without doing them any injury.
[Action]
 

It is only necessary to have courage, for strength without self-confidence is useless.
 

Love is a great poet, its resources are inexhaustible, but if the end it has in view is not obtained, it feels weary and remains silent.
[Heartbreak]
 

Love is three quarters curiosity.
 

Man is free; yet we must not suppose that he is at liberty to do everything he pleases, for he becomes a slave the moment he allows his actions to be ruled by passion.
 

Marriage is the tomb of love.
[Marriage]
 

My errors will point to thinking men the various roads, and will teach them the great art of treading on the brink of the precipice without falling into it.
[Art]
 

My success and my misfortunes, the bright and the dark days I have gone through, everything has proved to me that in this world, either physical or moral, good comes out of evil just as well as evil comes out of good.
 

Real love is the love that sometimes arises after sensual pleasure: if it does, it is immortal; the other kind inevitably goes stale, for it lies in mere fantasy.
 

Should I perchance still feel after my death, I would no longer have any doubt, but I would most certainly give the lie to anyone asserting before me that I was dead.
 

The history of my life must begin by the earliest circumstance which my memory can evoke; it will therefore commence when I had attained the age of eight years and four months.
[Begin]
 

The man who has sufficient power over himself to wait until his nature has recovered its even balance is the truly wise man, but such beings are seldom met with.
 

The mind of a human being is formed only of comparisons made in order to examine analogies, and therefore cannot precede the existence of memory.
 

The reader of these Memoirs will discover that I never had any fixed aim before my eyes, and that my system, if it can be called a system, has been to glide away unconcernedly on the stream of life, trusting to the wind wherever it led.
 

Thence, I suppose, my natural disposition to make fresh acquaintances, and to break with them so readily, although always for a good reason, and never through mere fickleness.
 

We avenge intellect when we dupe a fool, and it is a victory not to be despised for a fool is covered with steel and it is often very hard to find his vulnerable part.
 

Worthy or not, my life is my subject, and my subject is my life.
 

You will be amused when you see that I have more than once deceived without the slightest qualm of conscience, both knaves and fools.
 


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