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Havelock Ellis Quotes


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It has always been difficult for Man to realize that his life is all an art. It has been more difficult to conceive it so than to act it so. For that is always how he has more or less acted it.
 

It is becoming clear that the old platitudes can no longer be maintained, and that if we wish to improve our morals we must first improve our knowledge.
 

It is on our failures that we base a new and different and better success.
 

It is only the great men who are truly obscene. If they had not dared to be obscene, they could never have dared to be great.
 

Jealousy, that dragon which slays love under the pretense of keeping it alive.
 

Life is livable because we know that wherever we go most of the people we meet will be restrained in their actions toward us by an almost instinctive network of taboos.
[Human Relations]
 

Man lives by imagination.
 

Men who know themselves are no longer fools. They stand on the threshold of the door of Wisdom.
 

No act can be quite so intimate as the sexual embrace.
 

No faith is our own that we have not arduously won.
 

Of woman as a real human being, with sexual needs and sexual responsibilities, morality has often known nothing.
 

One can know nothing of giving aught that is worthy to give unless one also knows how to take.
 

Pain and death are part of life. To reject them is to reject life itself.
 

Philosophy is a purely personal matter. A genuine philosopher's credo is the outcome of a single complex personality; it cannot be transferred. No two persons, if sincere, can have the same philosophy.
 

Sex lies at the root of life, and we can never learn to reverence life until we know how to understand sex.
 

Socialism also brings us up against the hard rock of eugenic fact which, if we neglect it, will dash our most beautiful social construction to fragments.
 

Still, whether we like it or not, the task of speeding up the decrease of the human population becomes increasingly urgent.
 

The absence of flaw in beauty is itself a flaw.
 

The art of dancing stands at the source of all the arts that express themselves first in the human person. The art of building, or architecture, is the beginning of all the arts that lie outside the person; and in the end they unite.
 

The average husband enjoys the total effect of his home but is usually unable to contribute any of the details of work and organisation that make it enjoyable.
 


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