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Henry Brooks Adams Quotes


An American journalist, historian, academic and novelist. He is best-known for his autobiographical book, The Education of Henry Adams.
(1838 - 1918)

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A friend in power is a friend lost.
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A man must now swallow more belief than he can digest.
[Belief]
 

A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops.
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Absolute liberty is absence of restraint; responsibility is restraint; therefore, the ideally free individual is responsible to himself.
 

Accident counts for as much in companionship as in marriage.
[Friendship]
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All experience is an arch, to build upon.
[Experience]
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American society is a sort of flat, fresh-water pond which absorbs silently, without reaction, anything which is thrown into it.
 

At best, the renewal of broken relations is a nervous matter.
 

Chaos often breeds life when order breeds habit.
[History]
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Chaos was the law of nature; Order was the dream of man.
 

Even in America, the Indian summer of life should be a little sunny and a little sad, like the season, and infinite in wealth and depth of tone - but never hustled.
[Age]
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Every man should have a fair-sized cemetery in which to bury the faults of his friends.
[Family]
 

Every man who has at last succeeded, after long effort, in calling up the divinity which lies hidden in a woman's heart, is startled to find that he must obey the God he summoned.
 

Everyone carries his own inch-rule of taste, and amuses himself by applying it, triumphantly, wherever he travels.
[Taste]
 

Friends are born, not made.
 

Friendship needs a certain parallelism of life, a community of thought, a rivalry of aim.
[Friendship]
 

He too serves a certain purpose who only stands and cheers.
[Politics]
 

I am an anarchist in politics and an impressionist in art as well as a symbolist in literature. Not that I understand what these terms mean, but I take them to be all merely synonyms of pessimist.
 

I have written too much history to have faith in it; and if anyone thinks I'm wrong, I am inclined to agree with him.
 

I tell you the solemn truth, that the doctrine of the Trinity is not so difficult to accept for a working proposition as any one of the axioms of physics.
 


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