> Author Index > B - Authors > Isaac Barrow Quotes

Isaac Barrow Quotes


An English scholar and mathematician who is generally given credit for his early role in the development of infinitesimal calculus; in particular, for the discovery of the fundamental theorem of calculus.
(1630 - 1677)

Pages: 12Next

A constant governance of our speech, according to duty and reason, is a high instance and a special argument of a thoroughly sincere and solid goodness.
[Speech]
 

Alexander the Great, reflecting on his friends degenerating into sloth and luxury, told them that it was a most slavish thing to luxuriate, and a most royal thing to labor.
[Labor]
 

Because men believe not in Providence, therefore they do so greedily scrape and hoard. They do not believe in any reward for charity, therefore they will part with nothing.
 

Chance never write a legible book; never built a fair house; never drew a neat picture; never did any of these things, nor ever will; nor can it, without absurdity, be supposed to do them, which are yet works very gross and rude, and very easy and feasible, as it were, in comparison to the production of a flower or a tree.
 

Even private persons in due season, with discretion and temper, may reprove others, whom they observe to commit sin, or follow bad courses, out of charitable design, and with hope to reclaim them.
 

Facetiousness is allowable when it is the most proper instrument of exposing things apparently base and vile to due contempt.
 

He who loveth a book will never want a faithful friend, a wholesome counsellor, a cheerful companion, or an effectual comforter.
 

I pass by that it is very culpable to be facetious in obscene and smutty matters.
 

If men are wont to play with swearing anywhere, can we expect they should be serious and strict therein at the bar or in the church.
 

In defiance of all the torture, the might, and the malice of the world, the liberal man will ever be rich; for God's providence is his estate, God's wisdom and power his defense, God's love and favor his reward, and God's word his security.
 

Incredulity is not wisdom, but the worst kind of folly. It is folly, because it causes ignorance and mistake, with all the consequences of these; and it is very bad, as being accompanied with disingenuity, obstinacy, rudeness, uncharitableness, and the like bad dispositions, from which credulity itself, the other extreme sort of folly, is exempt.
 

Infidelity, indeed, is the root of all sin; for did man heartily believe the promises to obedience, and the threats to disobedience, they could hardly be so unreasonable as to forfeit the one or incur the other.
[Infidelity]
 

It is safe to make a choice of your thoughts, scarcely ever safe to express them all.
 

Jesting when not used upon improper matter, in an unfit manner, with excessive measure, at undue season, or to evil purpose, may be allowed.
 

Let us consider that swearing is a sin of all others peculiarly clamorous, and provocative of Divine judgment.
 

No man speaketh, or should speak, of his prince, that which he hath not weighed whether it will consist with that veneration which should be preserved inviolate to him.
 

None are too wise to be mistaken, but few are so wisely just as to acknowledge and correct their mistakes, and especially the mistakes of prejudice.
[Prejudice]
 

Nothing hath wrought more prejudice to religion, or brought more disparagement upon truth, than boisterous and unseasonable zeal.
[Zeal]
 

Nothing of worthy or weight can be achieved with half a mind, with a faint heart, and with a lame endeavor.
 

Sin is never at a stay; if we do not retreat from it, we shall advance in it; and the further on we go, the more we have to come back.
[Sin]
 


Pages: 12Next