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John Dewey Quotes


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Individuality, conceived as a temporal development involves uncertainty, indeterminacy, or contingency. Individuality is the source of whatever is unpredictable in the world.
 

Just as a flower which seems beautiful and has color but no perfume, so are the fruitless words of the man who speaks them but does them not.
 

Luck, bad if not good, will always be with us. But it has a way of favoring the intelligent and showing its back to the stupid.
 

Man is not logical and his intellectual history is a record of mental reserves and compromises. He hangs on to what he can in his old beliefs even when he is compelled to surrender their logical basis.
 

Man lives in a world of surmise, of mystery, of uncertainties.
 

Men's fundamental attitudes toward the world are fixed by the scope and qualities of the activities in which they partake.
 

Nature is the mother and the habitat of man, even if sometimes a stepmother and an unfriendly home.
 

No man's credit is as good as his money.
 

Now in any social group whatever, even in a gang of thieves, we find some interest held in common, and we find a certain amount of interaction and cooperative intercourse with other groups. From these two traits we derive a standard.
 

One lives with so many bad deeds on one's conscience and some good intentions in one's heart.
 

One of the fundamental problems of education in and for a democratic society is set by the conflict of a nationalistic and a wider social aim.
 

Only in education, never in the life of farmer, sailor, merchant, physician, or laboratory experimenter, does knowledge mean primarily a store of information aloof from doing.
 

School is not preparation for life, but school is life.
 

Search for a single, inclusive good is doomed to failure. Such happiness as life is capable of comes from the full participation of all our powers in the endeavor to wrest from each changing situation of experience its own full and unique meaning.
[Happiness]
 

Since changes are going on anyway, the great thing is to learn enough about them so that we will be able to lay hold of them and turn them in the direction of our desires. Condi-tions and events are neither to be fled from nor passively acquiesced in; they are to be utilized and directed.
 

Skepticism becomes the mark and even the pose of the educated mind. It is no longer directed against this and that article of the older creeds but is rather a bias against any kind of far-reaching ideas, and a denial of systematic participation on the part of such ideas in the intelligent direction of affairs.
 

Society is one word, but many things. Men associate together in all kinds of ways and for all kinds of purposes. One man is concerned in a multitude of diverse groups, in which his associates may be quite different. It often seems as if they had nothing in common except that they are modes of associated life.
 

Some attitudes may be named... which are central in effective intellectual ways of dealing with subject matter. Among the most important are directness, open-mindedness, single-mindedness (or whole-heartedness), and responsibility.
 

Such happiness as life is capable of comes from the full participation of all our powers in the endeavor to wrest from each changing situations of experience its own full and unique meaning.
 

Teaching may be compared to selling commodities. No one can sell unless somebody buys.
 


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