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Joseph Addison Quotes


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A misery is not to be measured from the nature of the evil, but from the temper of the sufferer.
[Misery]
 

A money-lender. He serves you in the present tense; he lends you in the conditional mood; keeps you in the subjunctive; and ruins you in the future!
 

A perfect tragedy is the noblest production of human nature.
 

A reader seldom peruses a book with pleasure until he knows whether the writer of it be a black man or a fair man, of a mild or choleric disposition, married or a bachelor.
 

A satire should expose nothing but what is corrigible, and should make a due discrimination between those that are, and those that are not the proper objects of it.
[Satire]
 

A soul exasperated by its ills, falls out with everything, with its friend and itself.
[Misfortune]
 

A true critic ought to dwell upon excellencies rather than imperfections, to discover the concealed beauties of a writer, and communicate to the world such things as are worth their observation.
 

A well regulated commerce is not like law, physic, or divinity, to be overstocked with hands; but, on the contrary, flourishes by multitudes, and gives employment to all its professors.
[Commerce]
 

A woman seldom asks advice before she has bought her wedding clothes.
 

Admiration is a very short-lived passion that immediately decays upon growing familiar with its object, unless it be still fed with fresh discoveries, and kept alive by a perpetual succession of miracles rising into view.
[Admiration]
 

All of heaven we have below.
[Music]
 

All well-regulated families set apart an hour every morning for tea and bread and butter
 

Allegories, when well chosen, are like so many tracks of light in a discourse, that make everything about them clear and beautiful
 

Among all kinds of Writing, there is none in which Authors are more apt to miscarry than in Works of Humour, as there is none in which they are more ambitious to excel.
 

An indiscreet man is more hurtful than an ill-natured one; for the latter will only attack his enemies, and those he wishes ill to; the other injures indifferently both friends and foes.
 

An opera may be allowed to be extravagantly lavish in its decorations, as its only design is to gratify the senses and keep up an indolent attention in the audience
 

An ostentatious man will rather relate a blunder or an absurdity he has committed, than be debarred from talking of his own dear person.
 

And pleas'd th' Almighty's orders to perform. Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.
[Providence]
 

Animals, in their generation, are wiser than the sons of men; but their wisdom is confined to a few particulars, and lies in a very narrow compass.
 

Arguments out of a pretty mouth are unanswerable.
[Argument]
 


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