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Marcus Aurelius Quotes


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And thou wilt give thyself relief, if thou doest every act of thy life as if it were the last.
 

Anger cannot be dishonest.
 

Anything in any way beautiful derives its beauty from itself and asks nothing beyond itself. Praise is no part of it, for nothing is made worse or better by praise.
 

Aptitude found in the understanding and is often inherited. Genius coming from reason and imagination, rarely.
 

As the same fire assumes different shapes When it consumes objects differing in shape, So does the one Self take the shape Of every creature in whom he is present.
 

Ask thyself, daily, to how many ill-minded persons thou hast shown a kind disposition.
[Kindness]
 

At dawn of day, when you dislike being called, have this thought ready: "I am called to man's labour; why then do I make a difficulty if I am going out to do what I was born to do and what I was brought into the world for?"
 

Be content with what you are, and wish not change; nor dread your last day, nor long for it.
[Change]
 

Be not careless in deeds, nor confused in words, nor rambling in thought.
 

Because a thing seems difficult for you, do not think it impossible for anyone to accomplish.
 

Because your own strength is unequal to the task, do not assume that it is beyond the powers of man; but if anything is within the powers and province of man, believe that it is within your own compass also.
 

Begin - to begin is half the work, let half still remain; again begin this, and thou wilt have finished.
[Begin]
 

By a tranquil mind I mean nothing else than a mind well ordered.
 

Confine yourself to the present.
 

Consider how much more you often suffer from your anger and grief than from those very things for which you are angry and grieved.
[Anger]
 

Constantly regard the universe as one living being, having one substance and one soul; and observe how all things have reference to one perception, the perception of this one living being; and how all things act with one movement; and how all things are the cooperating causes of all things which exist; observe too the continuous spinning of the thread and the contexture of the web.
 

Death hangs over thee: whilst yet thou livest, whilst thou mayest, be good.
 

Death is a release from the impressions of the senses, and from desires that make us their puppets, and from the vagaries of the mind, and from the hard service of the flesh.
 

Death, like birth, is a secret of Nature.
 

Despise not death, but welcome it, for nature wills it like all else.
 


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