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Marcus Aurelius Quotes


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I have often wondered how it is that every man loves himself more than all the rest of men, but yet sets less value on his own opinions of himself than on the opinions of others.
 

I often marvel how it is that though each man loves himself beyond all else, he should yet value his own opinion of himself less than that of others.
 

If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.
 

If mind is common to us, then also the reason, whereby we are reasoning beings, is common. If this be so, then also the reason which enjoins what is to be done or left undone is common. If this be so, law also is common; if this be so, we are citizens; if this be so, we are partakers in one constitution; if this be so, the Universe is a kind of Commonwealth.
 

If thou workest at that which is before thee, following right reason seriously, vigorously, calmly, without allowing anything else to distract thee, but keeping thy divine part pure, as if thou shouldst be bound to give it back immediately; if thou holdest to this, expecting nothing, fearing nothing, but satisfied with thy present activity according to Nature, and with heroic truth in every word and sound which thou utterest, thou wilt live happy. And there is no man who is able to prevent this.
[Action]
 

If we begin with certainties, we shall end in doubts; if we begin with doubts, and are patient, we shall end in certainties.
 

If you are distressed by anything external, the pain is not due to the thing itself, but to your estimate of it; and this you have the power to revoke at any moment.
[Events]
 

In life the three acts are the whole drama; for what shall be a complete drama is determined by him who was once the cause of its composition, and now of its dissolution: but thou art not the cause of neither. Depart then satisfied; for he also who releases thee is satisfied.
 

In the morning, when you are sluggish about getting up, let this thought be present: 'I am rising to a man's work.'
 

It is man's peculiar duty to love even those who wrong him.
 

It is not death that a man should fear, but he should fear never beginning to live.
 

It is not the weight of the future or the past that is pressing upon you, but ever that of the present alone. Even this burden, too, can be lessened if you confine it strictly to its own limits.
[The Present]
 

It is the act of a madman to pursue impossibilities.
 

It is the duty of men to love even those who injure them.
[Love]
 

Let it be your constant method to look into the design of people's actions, and see what they would be at, as often as it is practicable; and to make this custom the more significant, practice it first upon yourself.
 

Let men see, let them know, a real man, who lives as he was meant to live.
 

Let not your mind run on what you lack as much as on what you have already.
 

Let them know a real man, who lives as he was meant to live.
 

Let your occupations be few, says the sage, "if you would lead a tranquil life."
 

Life is a stranger's sojourn, a night at an inn.
[Life]
 


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