> Author Index > A - Authors > Mary Astell Quotes

Mary Astell Quotes


Pages: Prev 123Next

None of us whether Men or Women but have so good an Opinion of our own Conduct as to believe we are fit, if not to direct others, at least to govern our selves.
 

Nor can the Apostle mean that Eve only sinned; or that she only was Deceived, for if Adam sinned willfully and knowingly, he became the greater Transgressor.
 

That Man indeed can never be good at heart, who is full of himself and his own Endowments.
 

That which has not a real excellency and value in it self, entertains no longer than the giddy Humour which recommended it to us holds.
 

The design of Rhetoric is to remove those Prejudices that lie in the way of Truth, to Reduce the Passions to the Government of Reasons; to place our Subject in a Right Light, and excite our Hearers to a due consideration of it.
 

The Relation we bear to the Wisdom of the Father, the Son of His Love, gives us indeed a dignity which otherwise we have no pretence to. It makes us something, something considerable even in God's Eyes.
 

The scum of the People are most Tyrannical when they get the Power, and treat their Betters with the greatest Insolence.
 

The Soul debases her self, when she sets her affections on any thing but her creator.
 

The Span of Life is too short to be trifled away in unconcerning and unprofitable Matters.
 

The Steps to Folly as well as Sin are gradual, and almost imperceptible, and when we are once on the Decline, we go down without taking notice on't.
 

To all the rest of his Absurdities, (for vice is always unreasonable,) he adds one more, who expects that Vertue from another which he won't practise himself.
 

To plead for the Oppress'd and to defend the Weak seem'd to me a generous undertaking; for tho' it may be secure, 'tis not always Honourable to run over to the strongest party.
 

Truth is strong, and sometime or other will prevail.
 

Unhappy is that Grandeur which makes us too great to be good; and that Wit which sets us at a distance from true Wisdom.
 

Upon the principles of reason, the good of many is preferable to the good of a few or of one; a lasting good is to be preferred before a temporary, the public before the private.
 

We all agree that its fit to be as Happy as we can, and we need no Instructor to teach us this Knowledge, 'tis born with us, and is inseparable from our Being, but we very much need to be Inform'd what is the true Way to Happiness.
 

We may not commit a lesser Sin under pretence to avoid a greater, but we may, nay we ought to endure the greatest Pain and Grief rather than commit the least Sin.
 

We must Think what we Say, and Mean what we Profess.
 

We ought as much as we can to endeavour the Perfecting of our Beings, and that we be as happy as possibly we may.
 

Whilst our Hearts are violently set upon any thing, there is no convincing us that we shall ever be of another Mind.
 


Pages: Prev 123Next