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Mortimer Adler Quotes


An American educator, philosopher, and popular author.
(1902 - 2001)

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All books will become light in proportion as you find light in them.
 

Aristotle uses a mother's love for her child as the prime example of love or friendship.
 

Ask others about themselves, at the same time, be on guard not to talk too much about yourself.
 

Conjugal love, or the friendship of spouses, can persist even after sexual desires have weakened, withered, and disappeared.
 

Erotic or sexual love can truly be love if it is not selfishly sexual or lustful.
 

Freedom is the emancipation from the arbitrary rule of other men.
 

Freud's view is that all love is sexual in its origin or its basis. Even those loves which do not appear to be sexual or erotic have a sexual root or core. They are all sublimations of the sexual instinct.
 

Friendship is a very taxing and arduous form of leisure activity.
 

I find the selectivity of erotic love - the choice of this man or this woman - much more intelligible if liking the person is the origin of sexual interest, rather than the other way.
 

I wonder if most people ever ask themselves why love is connected with reproduction. And if they do ask themselves about this, I wonder what answer they give.
 

If one wants another only for some self-satisfaction, usually in the form of sensual pleasure, that wrong desire takes the form of lust rather than love.
 

If you never ask yourself any questions about the meaning of a passage, you cannot expect the book to give you any insight you do not already possess.
 

In English we must use adjectives to distinguish the different kinds of love for which the ancients had distinct names.
 

In every instance of acquisitive desire we are impelled to seek something for ourselves-to get it, consume it, appropriate or possess it in some way.
 

In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but how many can get through to you.
 

It is love rather than sexual lust or unbridled sexuality if, in addition to the need or want involved, there is also some impulse to give pleasure to the persons thus loved and not merely to use them for our own selfish pleasure.
 

Love can be unselfish, in the sense of being benevolent and generous, without being selfless.
 

Love consists in giving without getting in return; in giving what is not owed, what is not due the other. That's why true love is never based, as associations for utility or pleasure are, on a fair exchange.
 

Love wishes to perpetuate itself. Love wishes for immortality.
 

Love without conversation is impossible.
 


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