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Ralph Waldo Emerson Quotes


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Make yourself necessary to somebody. Do not make life hard to any.
[Helping Other People]
 

Man is a god in ruins.
 

Man is a piece of the universe made alive.
[Man]
 

Man is physically as well as metaphysically a thing of shreds and patches, borrowed unequally from good and bad ancestors, and a misfit from the start.
 

Man was born to be rich, or grow rich by use of his faculties, by the union of thought with nature. Property is an intellectual production. The game requires coolness, right reasoning, promptness, and patience in the players. Cultivated labor drives out brute labor.
[Riches]
 

Manners require time, and nothing is more vulgar than haste.
[Haste]
 

Men achieve a certain greatness unawares, when working to another aim.
 

Men admire the man who can organize their wishes and thoughts in stone and wood and steel and brass.
 

Men are conservatives when they are least vigorous, or when they are most luxurious. They are conservatives after dinner.
 

Men are what their mothers made them. You may as well ask a loom which weaves huckaback, why it does not make cashmere, as expect poetry from this engineer, or a chemical discovery from that jobber.
[Men]
 

Men love to wonder, and that is the seed of science.
[Science]
 

Men of God have always, from time to time, walked among men, and made their commission felt in the heart and soul of the commonest hearer.
[Preaching]
 

Men run away to other countries because they are not good in their own, and run back to their own because they pass for nothing in the new places.
 

Men suffer all their life long, under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time.
 

Men's actions are too strong for them. Show me a man who has acted, and who has not been the victim and slave of his action.
[Action]
 

Money often costs too much.
 

Money, which represents the prose of life, and which is hardly spoken of in parlors without an apology, is, in its effects and laws, as beautiful as roses.
 

Most of the shadows of this life are caused by our standing in our own sunshine.
 

My evening visitors, if they cannot see the clock, should find the time in my face.
[Observation]
 

My friends have come to me unsought. The great God gave them to me. By oldest right, by the divine affinity of virtue with itself, I find them, or rather not I, but the Deity in me and in them derides and cancels the thick walls of individual character, relation, age, sex, circumstance, at which he usually connives, and now makes many one.
 


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