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Rene Descartes Quotes


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If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.
 

If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things.
 

Illusory joy is often worth more than genuine sorrow.
[Positive]
 

In order to improve the mind, we ought less to learn, than to contemplate.
 

It is a mark of prudence never to trust wholly in those things which have once deceived us.
 

It is easy to hate and it is difficult to love. This is how the whole scheme of things works. All good things are difficult to achieve; and bad things are very easy to get.
 

It is not enough to have a good mind. The main thing is to use it well.
 

It is only prudent never to place complete confidence in that by which we have even once been deceived.
 

Nothing comes out of nothing.
 

Nothing is more fairly distributed than common sense: no one thinks he needs more of it than he already has.
 

Of all things, good sense is the most fairly distributed: everyone thinks he is so well supplied with it that even those who are the hardest to satisfy in every other respect never desire more of it than they already have.
 

One cannot conceive anything so strange and so implausible that it has not already been said by one philosopher or another.
 

Perfect numbers like perfect men are very rare.
 

So blind is the curiosity by which mortals are possessed, that they often conduct their minds along unexplored routes, having no reason to hope for success, but merely being willing to risk the experiment of finding whether the truth they seek lies there.
 

Staying as I am, one foot in one country and the other in another, I find my condition very happy, in that it is free.
 

The first precept was never to accept a thing as true until I knew it as such without a single doubt.
 

The greatest minds are capable of the greatest vices as well as of the greatest virtues.
 

The last rule was to make enumerations so complete, and reviews so comprehensive, that I should be certain of omitting nothing.
 

The reading of all good books is indeed like a conversation with the noblest men of past centuries who were the authors of them, nay a carefully studied conversation, in which they reveal to us none but the best of their thoughts.
 

The senses deceive from time to time, and it is prudent never to trust wholly those who have deceived us even once.
 


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