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Richard Cumberland Quotes


English bishop
(1631 - 1718)

Abundance is a blessing to the wise; the use of riches in discretion lies; learn this, ye men of wealth - a heavy purse in a fool's pocket is a heavy curse.
[Abundance]
 

All are not just because they do no wrong; but he who will not wrong me when he may, he is truly just.
[Justice]
 

Games of chance are traps to catch school-boy novices and gaping country squires, who begin with a guinea and end with a mortgage.
[Gambling]
 

Gaming finds a man a cully, and leaves him a knave.
[Gambling]
 

I do not mean to expose my ideas to ingenious ridicule by maintaining that everything happens to every man for the best; but I will contend, that he who makes the best use of it, fulfills the part of a wise and good man.
[Destiny]
 

I look upon every man as a suicide from the moment he takes the dice box desperately in his hand; all that follows in his career from that fatal time is only sharpening the dagger before he strikes it to his heart.
 

I look upon every man as a suicide from the moment he takes the dice-box desperately in his hand. - All that follows in his fatal career, from that time, is only sharpening the dagger before he strikes it to his heart.
[Gambling]
 

It is an old saying, that charity begins at home; but this is no reason it should not go abroad; a man should live with the world as a citizen of the world; he may have a preference for the particular quarter or square, or even alley in which he lives, but he should have a generous feeling for the welfare of the whole.
[Philanthropy]
 

It is an old saying, that charity begins at home; but this is no reason that it should not go abroad: a man should live with the world as a citizen of the world; he may have a preference for the particular quarter or square, or even alley in which he lives, but he should have a generous feeling for the welfare of the whole.
[Charity]
 

Nothing is more hateful to a poor man than the purse-proud arrogance of the rich. - But let the poor man become rich and he runs at once into the vice against which he so feelingly declaimed, - There are strange contradictions in human character.
[Arrogance]
 

Of all bad things by which mankind are curst, their own bad tempers surely are the worst.
[Temper]
 

People have a custom of excusing the enormities of their conduct by talking of their passions, as if they were under the control of a blind necessity, and sinned because they could not help it.
[Passion]
 

Politeness is nothing more than an elegant and concealed species of flattery, tending to put the person to whom it is addressed in good-humor and respect with himself: but if there is a parade and display affected in it, if a man seems to say - look how condescending and gracious I am! - whilst he has only the common offices of civility to perform, such politeness seems founded in mistake, and this mistake I have observed frequently to occur in French manners.
[Politeness]
 

Pride is never more offensive than when it condescends to be civil; whereas vanity, whenever it forgets itself, naturally assumes good humor.
[Pride]
 

The happy gift of being agreeable seems to consist not in one, but in an assemblage of talents tending to communicate delight; and how many are there, who, by easy manners, sweetness of temper, and a variety of other indefinable qualities, possess the power of pleasing without any visible effort, without the aids of wit, wisdom, or learning, nay, as it should seem, in their defiance; and this without appearing even to know that they possess it.
 

The happy gift of being agreeable seems to consist not in one, but in an assemblage of talents tending to communicate delight; and how many are there, who, by easy manners, sweetness of temper, and a variety of other undefinable qualities, possess the power of pleasing without any visible effort, without the aids of wit, wisdom, or learning, nay, as it should seem, in their defiance; and this without appearing even to know that they possess it.
[Manners]
 

The passions may be humored till they become our masters, as a horse may be pampered till he gets the better of his rider; but early discipline will prevent mutiny, and keep the helm in the hands of reason.
[Passion]
 

This world has cares enough to plague us; but he who meditates on others' woe, shall, in that meditation, lose his own.
[Care]