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Samuel Butler Quotes


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Art has no end in view save the emphasizing and recording in the most effective way some strongly felt interest or affection.
 

As a general rule philosophy is like stirring mud or not letting a sleeping dog lie. It is an attempt to deny, circumvent or otherwise escape from the consequences of the interlacing of the roots of things with one another.
 

Be virtuous and you will be vicious.
 

Belief like any other moving body follows the path of least resistance.
 

Books are like imprisoned souls till someone takes them down from a shelf and frees them.
 

Books should be tried by a judge and jury as though they were crimes.
 

Brigands demand your money or your life; women require both.
 

By a merciful dispensation of Providence university training is almost as costly as it is unprofitable. The majority will thus be always unable to afford it, and will base their opinions on mother wit and current opinion rather than on demonstration.
 

Christ and The Church: If he were to apply for a divorce on the grounds of cruelty, adultery and desertion, he would probably get one.
 

Christ was only crucified once and for a few hours. Think of the hundreds of thousands whom Christ has been crucifying in a quiet way ever since.
 

Christ: I dislike him very much. Still, I can stand him. What I cannot stand is the wretched band of people whose profession is to hoodwink us about him.
 

Conscience is thoroughly well-bred, and soon leaves off talking to those who do not wish to hear it.
[Conscience]
 

Critics generally come to be critics by reason not of their fitness for this but of their unfitness for anything else. Books should be tried by a judge and jury as though they were crimes, and counsel should be heard on both sides.
 

Death is only a larger kind of going abroad.
 

Do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Let the day's own trouble be sufficient for the day.
 

Don't learn to do, but learn in doing. Let your falls not be on a prepared ground, but let them be bona fide falls in the rough and tumble of the world.
 

Dullness is so much stronger than genius because there is so much more of it, and it is better organised and more naturally cohesive.
 

Every man's work, whether it be literature or music or pictures or architecture or anything else, is always a portrait of himself, and the more he tries to conceal himself the more clearly will his character appear in spite of him.
 

Every new idea has something of the pain and peril of childbirth about it; ideas are just as mortal and just as immortal as organised beings are.
 

Every one should keep a mental wastepaper basket and the older he grows the more things he will consign to it-torn up to irrecoverable tatters.
 


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