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Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes


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The Earth with its scarred face is the symbol of the Past; the Air and Heaven, of Futurity.
 

The fancy is indeed no other than a mode of memory emancipated from the order of time and space.
 

The first duty of a wise advocate is to convince his opponents that he understands their arguments, and sympathises with their just feelings.
[Argument]
 

The first idea of method is a progressive transition from one step to another in any course. - If in the right course, it will be the true method; if in the wrong, we cannot hope to progress.
[Method]
 

The genius of the Spanish people is exquisitely subtle, without being at all acute; hence there is so much humor and so little wit in their literature.
 

The Good consists in the congruity of a thing with the laws of the reason and the nature of the will, and in its fitness to determine the latter to actualize the former: and it is always discursive. The Beautiful arises from the perceived harmony of an object, whether sight or sound, with the inborn and constitutive rules of the judgment and imagination: and it is always intuitive.
 

The happiness of life is made up of minute fractions - the little, soon-forgotten charities of a kiss or smile, a kind look, a heartfelt compliment, and the countless infinitesimals of pleasurable and genial feeling.
[Happiness]
 

The heart should have fed upon the truth, as insects on a leaf, till it be tinged with the color, and show its food in every...minutest fiber.
 

The juggle of sophistry consists, for the most part, in using a word in one sense in the premises, and in another sense in the conclusion.
[Sophistry]
 

The love of a mother is the veil of a softer light between the heart and the heavenly Father.
 

The man's courage is loved by the woman, whose fortitude again is coveted by the man. His vigorous intellect is answered by her infallible tact. Can it be true, as is so constantly affirmed, that there is no sex in souls? I doubt it exceedingly.
[Love]
 

The man's desire is for the woman; but the woman's desire is rarely other than for the desire of the man.
 

The misery of human life is made up of large masses, each separated from the other by certain intervals. One year the death of a child; years after, a failure in trade; after another longer or shorter interval, a daughter may have married unhappily; in all but the singularly unfortunate, the integral parts that compose the sum total of the unhappiness of a man's life are easily counted and distinctly remembered.
[Misery]
 

The most happy marriage I can picture or imagine to myself would be the union of a deaf man to a blind woman.
 

The only choice which Providence has graciously left to a vicious government is either to fall by the people if they become enlightened, or with them, if they are kept enslaved and ignorant.
[Government]
 

The Pilgrim's Progress is composed in the lowest style of English, without slang or false grammar. If you were to polish it, you would at once destroy the reality of the vision. For works of imagination should be written in very plain language; the more purely imaginative they are the more necessary it is to be plain.
 

The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were) fuses, each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which I would exclusively appropriate the name of Imagination.
 

The present system of taking oaths is horrible. It is awfully absurd to make a man invoke God's wrath upon himself, if he speaks false; it is, in my judgment, a sin to do so.
 

The primary Imagination I hold to be the living power and prime agent of all human perception, and as a repetition in the finite mind of the eternal act of creation in the infinite I AM.
 

The principle of the Gothic architecture is infinity made imaginable. It is no doubt a sublimer effort of genius than the Greek style; but then it depends much more on execution for its effect.
 


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