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Sir Arthur Helps Quotes





A sceptical young man said to Dr. Parr that he would believe nothing which he could not understand. "Then," said the Doctor, "your creed will be the shortest of any man's I know."
 

All other passions condescend at times to accept the inexorable logic of facts; but jealousy looks facts straight in the face, and ignores them utterly, and says she knows a great deal better than they can tell her.
[Jealousy]
 

Be cheerful: do not brood over fond hopes unrealized until a chain is fastened on each thought and wound around the heart. Nature intended you to be the fountain-spring of cheerfulness and social life, and not the monument of despair and melancholy.
[Cheerfulness]
 

Experience is the extract of suffering.
[Experience]
 

Infinite toil would not enable you to sweep away a mist; but by ascending a little you may often look over it altogether. So it is with our moral improvement; we wrestle fiercely with a vicious habit, which would have no hold upon us if we ascended into a higher moral atmosphere.
 

It is a good thing to believe; it is a good thing to admire. By continually looking upwards, our minds will themselves grow upwards; as a man, by indulging in habits of scorn and contempt for others, is sure to descend to the level of those he despises.
[Admiration]
 

It is better in some respects to be admired by those with whom you live,, than to be loved by them. And this is not on account of any gratification of vanity, but because admiration is so much more tolerant than love.
[Admiration]
 

Many a man has a kind of kaleidoscope, where the broken bits of glass are his own merits and fortunes; and they fall into harmonious arrangements and delight him, often most mischievously, and to his ultimate detriment; but they are a present pleasure.
 

More than half the difficulties of the world would be allayed or removed by the exhibition of good temper.
[Temper]
 

Nature intended you to be the fountain-spring of cheerfulness and social life, and not the mountain of despair and melancholy.
[Lighten Up]
 

No man who has not sat in the assemblies of men can know the light, odd and uncertain ways in which decisions are often arrived at.
[Decisions]
 

Offended vanity is the great separator in social life.
[Vanity]
 

Patience is even more rarely manifested in the intellect than it is in the temper.
[Patience]
 

Temperament is but the atmosphere of character, while its groundwork in nature is fixed and unchangeable.
[Temper]
 

The man, at the head of the house, can mar the pleasure of the household, but he cannot make it. - That must rest with the woman, and it is her greatest privilege.
[Marriage]
 

The perverse temper of children is too often corrected with the rod, when the cause lies in fact in a diseased state of body.
[Temper]
 

There is a gift that is almost a blow, and there is a kind word that is munilicence; so much is there in the way of doing things.
 

To hear always, to think always, to learn always, it is thus that we live truly; he who aspires to nothing, and learns nothing, is not worthy of living.
 

Wise sayings often fall on barren ground, but a kind word is never thrown away.
[Helping Other People]