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Sir Francis Bacon Quotes


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Prosperity is the blessing of the Old Testament; adversity of the New, which carrieth the greater benediction and the dearer revelation of God's favor. Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes; adversity not without many comforts and hopes.
[Adversity]
 

Pure mathematics do remedy and cure many defects in the wit and faculties of individuals; for if the wit be dull, they sharpen it; _ if too wandering they fix it; if too inherent in the sense, they abstract it.
 

Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and take for granted, nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
[Reading]
 

Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man; and, therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not.
[Knowledge]
 

Reading serves for delight, for ornament, for ability.-The crafty contemn it; the simple admire it; the wise use it.
[Reading]
 

Rebellions of the belly are the worst.
 

Revenge is a kind of wild justice, which, the more a man's nature runs to, the more ought law to weed it out.
[Revenge]
 

Riches are a good hand maiden, but a poor mistress.
 

Riches are for spending, and spending for honor and good actions; therefore extraordinary expense must be limited by the worth of the occasion.
[Money]
 

Round dealing is the honor of man's nature; and a mixture of falsehood is like alloy in gold and silver, which may make the metal work the better, but it embaseth it.
[Falsehood]
 

Science is but an image of the truth.
 

Seek not proud wealth; but such as thou mayest get justly, use soberly, distribute cheerfully, and leave contentedly, yet have not any abstract or friarly contempt of it.
[Wealth]
 

Seek ye first the good things of the mind, and the rest will either be supplied or its loss will not be felt.
 

Silence is the sleep that nourishes wisdom.
 

Silence is the virtue of fools.
 

Small amounts of philosophy lead to atheism, but larger amounts bring us back to God.
 

Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
[Art]
 

Some intermixture of vain-glorious tempers puts life into business, and makes a fit composition in grand enter­prises and hazardous undertakings. For men of solid and sober natures have more of the ballast than the sail.
 

Some men think that the gratification of curiosity is the end of knowledge; some the love of fame; some the pleasure of dispute; some the necessity of supporting themselves by their knowledge; but the real use of all knowledge is this, that we should dedicate that reason which was given us by God to the use and advantage of man.
[Knowledge]
 

Studies perfect nature and are perfected still by experience.
 


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