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Books Quotes


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The books of Nature and of Revelation equally elevate our conceptions and invite our piety; they are both written by the finger of the one eternal, incomprehensible God.

The books that help you most, are those which make you think the most. - The hardest way of learning is that of easy reading; but a great book that comes from a great thinker is a ship of thought, deep freighted with truth and beauty.

The colleges, while they provide us with libraries, furnish no professors of books; and I think no chair is so much needed.

The constant habit of perusing devout books is so indispensable, that it has been termed the oil of the lamp of prayer. Too much reading, however, and too little meditation, may produce the effect of a lamp inverted; which is extinguished by the very excess of that aliment, whose property is to feed it.

The last thing that we discover in writing a book is to know what to put at the beginning.

The most foolish kind of a book is a kind of leaky boat on the sea of wisdom; some of the wisdom will get in anyhow.

The past but lives in written words: a thousand ages were blank if books had not evoked their ghosts, and kept the pale unbodied shades to warn us from fleshless lips.

The silent influence of books, is a mighty power in the world; and there is a joy in reading them known only to those who read them with desire and enthusiasm. - Silent, passive, and noiseless though they be, they yet set in action countless multitudes, and change the order of nations.

The society of dead authors has this advantage over that of the living: they never flatter us to our faces, nor slander us behind our backs, nor intrude upon our privacy, nor quit their shelves until we take them down.

The writings of the wise are the only riches our posterity cannot squander.

There is a kind of physiognomy in the titles of books no less than in the faces of men, by which a skillful observer will know as well what to expect from the one as the other.

There is no book so bad but something valuable may be derived from it.

There is no book so poor that it would not be a prodigy if wholly wrought out by a single mind, without the aid of prior investigators.

There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written or badly written. That is all.

There is no worse robber than a bad book.

There was a time when the world acted on books; now books act on the world.

Thou mayest as well expect to grow stronger by always eating as wiser by always reading. Too much overcharges nature, and turns more into disease than nourishment. It is thought and digestion which make books serviceable, and give health and vigor to the mind.

To buy books only because they were published by an eminent printer, is much as if a man should buy clothes that did not fit him, only because made by some famous tailor.

To use books rightly, is to go to them for help; to appeal to them when our own knowledge and power fail; to be led by them into wider sight and purer conception than our own, and to receive from them the united sentence of the judges and councils of all time, against our solitary and unstable opinions.

Tradition is but a meteor, which, if it once falls, cannot be rekindled. - Memory, once interrupted, is not to be recalled. - But written learning is a fixed luminary, which, after the cloud that had hidden it has passed away, is again bright in its proper station. - So books are faithful repositories, which may be awhile neglected or forgotten, but when opened again, will again impart instruction.


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