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Talking Quotes


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One learns tacturnity best among those who have none, and loquacity among the taciturn.

Speaking much is a sign of vanity, for he that is lavish in words is a niggard in deed.

Such as thy words are, such will thine affections be esteemed; and such as thine affections, will be thy deeds; and such as thy deeds will be thy life

Talkative people who wish to be loved are hated; when they desire to please, they bore; when they think they are admired, they are laughed at; they injure their friends, benefit their enemies, and ruin themselves.

Talkers are no good doers, be assured. - We go to use our hands and not our tongues.

The common fluency of speech in many men, and most women, is owing to a scarcity of matter and a scarcity of words; for whoever is a master of language and has a mind full of ideas, will be apt in speaking to hesitate upon the choice of both; whereas common speakers have only one set of ideas, and one set of words to clothe them in; and these are always ready at the mouth; so people come faster out of a church when it is almost empty, than when a crowd is at the door.

The lover and physician are both popular from the same cause. We talk to them only of ourselves. That, I daresay, was the origin of confession - egotism under the name of religion.

The man who talks everlastingly and promiscuously, and who seems to have an exhaustless magazine of sound, crowds so many words into his thoughts, that he always obscures, and very frequently conceals them.

The more ideas a man has the fewer words he takes to express them. Wise men never talk to make time; they talk to save it.

The talkative listen to no one, for they are ever speaking. - And the first evil that attends those who know not how to be silent, is, that they hear nothing.

The tongue of a fool is the key of his counsel, which, in a wise man, wisdom hath in keeping.

There are many who talk on from ignorance rather than from knowledge, and who find the former an inexhaustible fund of conversation.

There is the same difference between the tongues of some, as between the hour and the minute hand; one goes ten times as fast, and the other signifies ten times as much.

They talk most who have the least to say.

They think too little who talk too much.

Those who have few things to attend to are great babblers; for the less men think, the more they talk.

To talk without effort is, after all, the great charm of talking.

We often say things because we can say them well, rather than because they are sound and reasonable.

What a spendthrift he is of his tongue.

When I think of talking, it is of course with a woman. For talking at its best being an inspiration, it wants a corresponding divine quality of receptiveness, and where will you find this but in a woman?


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